Last edited by Zolozil
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of Status of the Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) in Washington. found in the catalog.

Status of the Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) in Washington.

Washington (State). Dept. of Wildlife.

Status of the Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) in Washington.

by Washington (State). Dept. of Wildlife.

  • 79 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Washington Dept. of Wildlife in Olympia, WA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Speyeria.,
  • Butterflies -- Washington (State),
  • Endangered species -- Washington (State)

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 27 p. :
    Number of Pages27
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17786139M

    To release an Oregon silverspot butterfly caterpillar, biologist Anne Walker takes it out of a little Tupperware container and sets it gently on its preferred food, the spade-shaped leaves of. The silverspot declined from a population of thousands to as little as on Mount Hebo, the species' largest population in Oregon, according to a report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    Oregon Parks and Recreation Department released Oregon silverspot butterfly caterpillars on the slopes of Saddle Mountain Friday in an effort to stabilize the declining species population in. Oregon silverspot butterfly -- Conservation -- Planning Wildlife recovery -- West (U.S.) -- Planning Rare butterflies -- West (U.S.) Restrictions on Access: This archived document is maintained by the State Library of Oregon as part of the Oregon Documents Depository Program.

    One of the Oregon Biodiversity Information Center's main tasks is to list and rank rare, threatened, and endangered species in Oregon. Using our Biotics biodiversity database of species occurrences throughout the state and by consulting with agencies, specialists, academics, and the public, ORBIC reviews and publishes this list every two to three years. Speyeria zerene hippolyta, Oregon silverspot Butterfly [English] Publication(s): Author(s)/Editor(s): Pelham, Jonathan P. Publication Date: Article/Chapter Title: A catalogue of the butterflies of the United States and Canada with a complete bibliography of the descriptive and systematic literature: Journal/Book Name, Vol. No.:Biological classification: Subspecies.


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Status of the Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) in Washington by Washington (State). Dept. of Wildlife. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Status of the Oregon Silverspot Butterfly in Washington Diversity Division, Wildlife Program. Information is subject to changes and amendments over time. June, WDFW Commission Meeting Presentation • Oregon silverspot continues to decline in Oregon and California.

Official Status: Threatened, the Oregon silverspot butterfly is federally listed under the Endangered Species Act as threatened. Date Listed: effective Octo; Federal Register: 45 FR (pdf, KB) Critical Habitat: Critical habitat was designated at the time of listing, and includes the salt-spray meadow between Big Creek and Rock Creek, Lane County, Oregon.

Speyeria zerene hippolyta, the Oregon silverspot, is a threatened butterfly that is found the U.S. states of California and Oregon. It is a subspecies of Speyeria zerene. The Oregon silverspot used to inhabit suitable coastal habitat from northern California, through Oregon, into southern : Nymphalidae.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) is federally and state listed as a threatened species. The silverspot occurred historically from Grays Harbor County in Washington to central Oregon and a disjunct population occurred in northern California.

In Washington it was found along the coast from Westport to the Columbia River. Species profile about species listing status, federal register publications, recovery, critical habitat, conservation planning, petitions, and life history U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service ECOS Environmental Conservation Online System.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speryeria zerene hippolyta) inhabits coastal grasslands near the Pacific Ocean and relies on a single plant - the early blue violet - to complete its life cycle. Once common on the Oregon Coast, this butterfly was reduced to four Oregon populations by the s.

Because of their complex life cycles and interdependent relationships with plants, butterflies are especially vulnerable to habitat loss, toxins, invasive species and climate change.

Over the past century in the U.S., vast areas of meadow and grassland butterfly habitats have been converted for housing, agriculture and industrial development, leaving many species in isolated.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly used to spread its wings across much of the Northwest, from the northern California coast clear up to British Columbia, but the species has struck dire times, with.

This includes coordination, inventory, management and research projects for the Oregon silverspot butterfly, the Fender's blue butterfly and the vernal pool fairy shrimp. The list of invertebrate species in the book Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species of Oregon reflects our current understanding of the status of the rare invertebrates in.

Oregon silverspot butterfly Scientific name: Speyeria zerene hippolyta Status: Threatened Critical Habitat: Designated Listing Activity: Oregon silverspot butterfly was listed as a threatened species with critical habitat in October A revised recovery plan was published in Historical Status and Current Trends The historical range of the Oregon silverspot butterfly subspecies.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly was once common on the Pacific coast. Today, it exists in just a handful of locations in Oregon. But biologists are bringing it back, one meadow at a time.

Scientific Name: Speyeria Zerene Hippolyta  Listed as Endangered in:  Oregon The Oregon Silverspot Butterfly lives in meadows in Oregon. Very little is know about its diet and its reproductive behaviors. Threats to this species include invasive species and habitat loss.

Very few conservation efforts are being made for this species, your. Oregon Silverspot Butterfly, Lloyd Brothers of Mount Adams, Bog Lily and Winter Dawn at Hosmer Lake () Oregon Field Guide: Episode # Most Recent Broadcast: February 8, Author: Ed Jahn.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly requires vanishing Northwest coastal grasslands to survive. When the butterfly was listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service init was only known to exist at one site in Oregon.

The Oregon silverspot butterfly once lived in coastal prairies from southern Washington through northern California. The Oregon silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) is listed as a threatened species under the United States Endangered Species Act. Patches of Oregon silverspot habitat occur in Oregon, Washington and California.

Development, grazing and off-road vehicles are all. Key resources needed by the Oregon silverspot butterfly in all of these habitats include: (1) The early blue violet, which is the primary host plant for Oregon silverspot caterpillars; (2) a variety of nectar plants that bloom during the butterfly flight period, including, but not.

The common name for the Oregon Silverspot butterfly is speyeria zerene Hippolyta. The butterfly is currently on the threatened species list. Federal Status: Threatened State Status: None. As imperiled insects go, the Oregon Silverspot is in pretty good shape.

It is federally listed as threatened rather than endangered. Fortunately, the threats to this butterfly’s habitats were recognized early enough so that drastic measures to ensure its continued existence are unlikely to be.

When U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services first began breeding the Oregon silverspot butterfly, they had only been found at one location: the top of Mount Hebo in the Oregon Coastal Range. Soon, a. Myrtle's silverspot (Speyeria zerene myrtleae) is a medium-sized butterfly in the brush foot family (Nymphalidae), an endangered subspecies of the zerene is endemic to California, where it is known from only about four locations just north of the San Francisco Bay Area, including two at Point Reyes National Seashore.

Its wingspan is approximately inches (56 mm). The upper Class: Insecta. The problem is that the Oregon Silverspot butterfly uses the early blue violet as a host plant and it is a threatened species. If we use the early blue violet for a dye, we will be taking away the environment for the Oregon Silverspot butterfly.

Therefore our plan of action should be to change the host plant for the Oregon Silverspot butterfly. Woodland Park Zoo joined the Oregon silverspot butterfly team in Along with the Oregon Zoo and Lewis and Clark College, we give silverspot butterfly caterpillars a safe head start in life.

It starts by teams from our zoos and our friends at US Fish and Wildlife going out into the field in Oregon in the few places where silverspot butterflies still hang on.Neil has been watching and photographing butterflies in Oregon for more than 30 years and has photographed more than butterfly species in the wilds of Oregon.

He is currently working on a book describing key butterfly habitats throughout Oregon with co-author Meera Subramanian. October 2,